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Hayden launches 'Security Conundrum' speaker series

News / October 3, 2014
"The Security Conundrum," a new Stanford speakers series launches Oct. 8 to explore how the United States can strike the right balance between security and liberty in a dangerous world. The first speaker is Gen. Michael Hayden, the former director of the NSA and CIA.
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Rules of War

News / October 2, 2014
Scott Sagan and Allen Weiner teach "Rules of War," a Thinking Matters course that investigates the legal rules that govern the resort to and conduct of war, and study whether these rules affect the conduct of states and individuals. The class will confront various ethical, legal, and strategic problems as they make decisions about military intervention and policies regarding the threat and use of force in an international crisis.
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Hecker wins NAE award for nuclear diplomacy

News / September 26, 2014
Siegfried Hecker, a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and Research Professor of Management Science and Engineering, has been awarded the National Academy of Engineering's Arthur M. Bueche Award "for contributions to nuclear science and engineering and for service to the nation through nuclear diplomacy."
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Stanford scholars on Obama's Middle East strategy

Commentary / September 24, 2014
FSI's Francis Fukuyama and former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry, a William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at CISAC, write in the Financial Times that President Barack Obama's stance on ISIS is "overpromising" and that the United States should follow lessons from British history and pursue a more sustainable strategy known as "offshore balancing."
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Rebuilding trust key to fighting Ebola in Africa

News / September 24, 2014
The Ebola epidemic, which could affect hundreds of thousands of West Africans, can only be contained by rebuilding public trust and local health systems decimated by years of neglect, according to a panel convened by the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Stanford Medicine. FSI Senior Fellows David Relman, Paul Wise, Stephen Stedman and Douglas Owens were among the panelists.
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Karl Eikenberry: Afghanistan

News / September 16, 2014

Karl Eikenberry, a William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at CISAC, former U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan and Lt. General in the U.S.

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Tag along with CISAC Honors Students during Honors College in Washington, D.C.

Blog / September 10, 2014
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Inaugural cyber boot camp brings congressional staffers to Silicon Valley

News / August 23, 2014

Two-dozen congressional staffers joined academic and Silicon Valley experts at Stanford’s inaugural cybersecurity boot camp to discuss ways to protect the government, the public and industry from cyber attacks, network crimes and breaches of personal privacy.

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CISAC takes global security lessons online

News / August 22, 2014

The atomic bombs had been dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki just before 18-year-old William J. Perry landed in Japan during the War of Occupation as a mapping specialist. He saw the devastation left behind by American firebombers on Tokyo and Okinawa.

The young man quickly understood the staggering magnitude of difference in the destruction caused by traditional firepower and these new atomic bombs. He would go on to devote his life to understanding, procuring and then trying to dismantle those weapons.

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Stanford expert describes how the U.S. and China can manage their relationship and avoid conflict

News / August 20, 2014

The United States and China can peacefully co-exist if they avoid history's most dangerous geopolitical pitfalls, according to a Stanford expert.

The key is not to presume an inevitable conflict, said Karl Eikenberry, the William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation and a faculty member of the Shorenstein Asia–Pacific Research Center.

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National Security in the Global Era

Commentary / August 12, 2014

Thomas Fingar, the Oksenberg Rohlen distinguished fellow at FSI, delivered a speech entitled, "National Security in the Global Era," at the Reves Center for International Studies at the College of William & Mary. His remarks touch upon the broader scope of national security, consequences of globalization for national security, and implications for international education.

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FSI's Mike McFaul on the 'judo master' in the Kremlin

Commentary / August 5, 2014
Former Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, is featured in this week's New Yorker magazine and writes in this Politico piece that Russia's President Vladimir Putin sees a path to glory that does not involve democratic governance and ignores international norms.
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Eikenberry: Thucydides Trap

News / August 4, 2014
Karl Eikenberry, a William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at CISAC and Shorenstein APARC Distinguished Fellow, describes U.S.-China relations in the historical context of the rise and fall of great powers, saying analysts must be critical to recognize the dissimilarities from past rivalries. His essay appears in American Review.
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Martin Hellman wonders why Tonkin Gulf incidents seem forgotten

Commentary / August 4, 2014
The first Tonkin Gulf incident occurred 50 years ago this week, giving the U.S. government legal basis for the Vietnam War. But as CISAC's Martin Hellman notes in this Huffington Post commentary, there has been little commemoration in the media.
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CISAC launches seed grant program for security research

News / August 1, 2014
CISAC has established the Security Research Seed Grant Program, small stipends of up to $5,000 that will encourage Stanford students to conduct security-related doctoral research via field studies, archival research or other methods.
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Jonathan Hunt: Cold War offers lessons for US-Iran diplomacy

News / July 11, 2014
CISAC McArthur Nuclear Fellow Jonathan Hunt says the secret history of Cold War détente offers a case study in how back-channel discussions at multilateral talks might help the United States and Iran resolve their differences.
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ISIS terrorist group potential threat to US, Crenshaw says

News / July 10, 2014
Terrorism expert Martha Crenshaw says the terrorist group known as ISIS poses a danger to the U.S. if it grows more powerful. But that organization, she adds, may be overreaching in its ruthlessness and religious zealotry.
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Hegghammer explores the motivations behind ISIS demand for Islamic state

News / July 8, 2014
CISAC Consulting Professor Thomas Hegghammer writes in this Lawfare foreign policy essay that the move by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) to declare itself an Islamic State with a caliphate as its leader in Iraq is a "bold and unprecedented" move.
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Felter: Insurgents attack aid programs to undermine governments

News / July 2, 2014
Research by CISAC Senior Research Scholar Joe Felter shows that insurgents try to derail government-delivered aid programs in poor areas because they fear successful programs will boost the government's credibility. Preventive measures include providing greater security around aid projects and limiting advance knowledge about them.
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CISAC's Anja Manuel talks to former British Foreign Secretary Miliband

News / July 2, 2014
CISAC affiliate Anja Manuel interviews the new president of the International Rescue Committee, former UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband, about the most pressing refugee crises today, including those in Syria, Iraq and South Sudan.
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Should the US Be Bullish or Bearish on China?

Commentary / June 20, 2014

CISAC Co-Director Amy Zegart writes in The American Interest that a strong and rising China, as well as a weak an unstable one, should concern the United States. But perhaps most troubling is the uncertainty about which scenario will eventually play out, and Washington’s strategic orientation toward Europe and the Middle East.

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