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Suspicion and mutual distrust may threaten U.S.-China relationship

News / December 16, 2013
Thomas Fingar and former CISAC Visiting Scholar Fan Jishe write that the U.S.-China relationship is stronger and more interdependent than ever, but mutual suspicion and distrust persists. They argue that four decades of stability have taught Beijing and Washington how to manage their relationship.
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South Korea has made huge strides by focusing on middle of fuel cycle

News / December 5, 2013
A team of CISAC researchers, led by Senior Fellow Siegfried Hecker, advises South Korea on how to keep its nuclear energy program robust and safe.
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Perry honored by Department of Defense for national security work

News / December 4, 2013
Former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry was conferred the Medal for Distinguished Public Service (Silver Palm) in recognition of his groundbreaking work in national and international security issues.
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Stanford scholars consider historic nuclear deal with Tehran

Q&A / November 26, 2013
Three experts consider the technical and political consequences of the historic agreement reached with Iran to temporarily halt its nuclear weapons program.
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CISAC, Russian nuclear institute launch joint website

News / November 25, 2013
CISAC and the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute have launched a website to chronicle more than 20 years of nuclear collaboration between the Russian Federation and the United States.
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Former FBI director targets cybercrimes

News / November 15, 2013
Robert Mueller said terrorism is still the FBI's top priority. But the agency needs to find new ways of fighting cybercrimes, which he calls "the threat of the future."
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Compromised by Design? Securing the Defense Electronics Supply Chain

Commentary / November 8, 2013

CISAC affiliate John Villasenor argues in this Brookings paper that the country's defense electronics supply chain is almost completely unprotected against a threat that may turn out to be more significant in the long term: Chips could be intentionally compromised during the design process, before they are even manufactured.

The paper aims to help frame the discussion regarding how best to respond to this important and underappreciated aspect of cybsercurity.

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Former FBI director to bolster security research at Stanford

News / November 5, 2013

Robert Mueller, the FBI's chief for the past 12 years, will spend the current academic year as a consulting professor and the Arthur and Frank Payne Distinguished Lecturer.

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Spytainment: Fake spies influence perception of real intelligence

News / November 4, 2013
Amy Zegart, CISAC co-director and associate director of academic affairs at Hoover, talks about the impact of "spytainment" on the American psyche.
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North Korea reactor restart sets back denuclearization

Commentary / October 17, 2013

Siegfried Hecker, a senior fellow at CISAC, writes in this commentary for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that North Korea's decision to restart its 5-megawatt nuclear reactor is a big step back for denuclearization.

"The most likely technical scenario is that the North Koreans will operate the restarted 5-megawatt reactor for two years with a full load of 8,000 fuel rods, cool this spent fuel and extract roughly 10 to 12 kilograms of plutnoium within three years," he writes.

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Why nuclear realism is unrealistic

Commentary / October 9, 2013

First paragraph of the article:

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Relman is awarded NIH innovation grant for microbial research

News / October 3, 2013
CISAC co-director David Relman, professor of microbiology and immunology at the Stanford School of Medicine, has been awarded a $6.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to to examine the effects of perturbations in the microbial ecology of humans.
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Zegart joins scholars at NSA for rare briefing on spy agency's woes

Q&A / September 26, 2013
CISAC Co-Director Amy Zegart joins other intelligence scholars for a rare briefing with high-ranking NSA officials to discuss the spy agency's policies and plummeting public trust.
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North Korea's Yongbyon nuclear facility appears ready for restart

News / September 12, 2013
CISAC's Nick Hansen and Jeffrey Lewis reveal new satellite imagery that indicates North Korea is likely restarting is nuclear reactor at Yongbyon, despite Pyongyang's commitment in 2007 to shut down the nuclear site.
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Perry Fellows take on the policy of bioengineering, military doctrine and nuclear deterrence

News / September 4, 2013
The incoming William J. Perry Fellows will focus on key security topics: governance and best practices in bioengineering; nuclear deterrence policy in the 21st century; and foreign military interventions and counterinsurgency doctrine.
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Ambassador to UN taps FSI's Weinstein as top adviser

News / September 4, 2013
As Ambassador Samantha Power's chief of staff, Jeremy M. Weinstein will serve as her principal policy adviser and play a central role in advancing her strategic priorities and U.S. foreign policy objectives at the U.N.
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The borderless view of Tino Cuéllar

News / August 30, 2013
In a Stanford Magazine profile, FSI Director Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar talks about his background, his scholarship and why there's a point to "taking on problems that are so difficult to solve that nobody can really expect that they're likely to be completely solved—ever."
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Former fellow wins award for best dissertation in international relations, law, and politics

News / August 27, 2013
Former CISAC Fellow Aila Matanock was awarded the Helen Dwight Reid Award for her dissertation, titled "International Insurance: Why Militant Groups and Governments Compete with Ballots Instead of Bullets." The award is given by the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation international relations, law, and politics.
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Eikenberry: Counterinsurgency fails in Afghanistan

News / August 20, 2013
The counterinsurgency plan in Afghanistan hinged on the assumption that the U.S. military could protect the population, that foreign aid could make the Afghan government more accountable, and that the Karzai administration shared U.S. goals. In an article published by Foreign Affairs, Karl Eikenberry – the William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at CISAC – explains why all three assumptions were "spectacularly incorrect."
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