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Center for International Security and Cooperation

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A statement on the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Seventy-five years after the first use of nuclear weapons and the founding of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, all the members of the Science and Security Board pledge to redouble their efforts to bring about a world in which the use of nuclear weapons is both unthinkable and impossible.
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Developments On The Coronavirus

Dr. David Relman, infectious diseases expert and microbiologist at Stanford Medicine, discusses the Oxford vaccine candidate and just how deadly COVID-19 can be.
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Testing the limits of China and Brazil’s partnership

During the periods when it sought international autonomy, Brazil has found in China an attractive partner in criticizing the liberal international order fostered by the United States in the wake of World War II.
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Why the atomic bombing of Hiroshima would be illegal today

The archival record makes clear that killing large numbers of civilians was the primary purpose of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Destruction of military targets was a secondary goal that "legitimized” the destruction for some participants. Today, a similar attack would violate three major requirements of the Geneva Conventions.

Putin's Russia and the War in Afghanistan 

Russia has tried to present itself as an ascendant global power, expanding its influence in Syria, Ukraine, as well as Afghanistan. But Putin's government is also grappling with a raging pandemic and an economic crisis. Listen as Steven Pifer discusses Russia's delicate political moment.

WATCH HERE

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Who We Are

The Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) is Stanford University’s hub for researchers tackling some of the world's most pressing security and international cooperation issues.

Founded 30 years ago, CISAC today is building on its historic strengths to seek solutions to the many longstanding and emerging challenges associated with an increasingly complex world. We are guided by our longstanding belief that a commitment to rigorous scholarship, openness to new ideas, and lively intellectual exchange can spur the creation and spread of knowledge to help build a safer world.

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Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

A world that is safer and more just.

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Stay up to date with Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation news, events, and more.

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Research

CISAC is a unique interdisciplinary nexus that researches and offers solutions to the most pressing security challenges in the world today.

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Education

CISAC is educating and training the next generation of thought leaders and policy makers in international security.

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Policy

CISAC’s research and policy work offers context and insights to decision-makers in Washington D.C. and throughout the world.

Leadership

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Rodney C. Ewing

Co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, FSI Senior Fellow
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Rodney C. Ewing

Co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, FSI Senior Fellow
Professor in Nuclear Security; Professor, Geological Sciences
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Colin Kahl

Co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, FSI Senior Fellow
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Colin Kahl

Co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, FSI Senior Fellow
Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
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Harold Trinkunas

Deputy Director
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Harold Trinkunas

Deputy Director
Senior Research Scholar
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Andrea Gray

Associate Director for Administration and Finance
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Andrea Gray

Associate Director for Administration and Finance