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Stanford experts offer insight on China's stock market dive

News / July 13, 2015

China's tight control over its economy is one reason why it is facing an economic slowdown of global implications, Stanford scholars say.

China's stock market fall is now in its third week, and share prices have lost a third of their value since mid-June, though the market is still higher than a year ago. China has the world's second-largest economy, with deep financial links to the United States.

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War of Words: Award-Winning Authors on the Literature of Combat

News / July 8, 2015
Generations of political scientists, philosophers, policymakers and historians have studied myriad aspects of war, but there are some things about war that only art and artists can express. “To understand how changes in war, technology and politics influence the foot soldiers, victims, and civilians and our overall memory, we don’t need political scientists and historians, we need pilots and poets, we need warriors and writers,” CISAC Senior Fellow Scott Sagan told a Stanford audience gathered at Bing Concert Hall.
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CISAC Cybersecurity Expert Gives Senate Testimony on Encryption Risks

News / July 8, 2015
It’s a technique that’s been used to calculate the odds of everything from the likelihood of a nuclear meltdown to the chances of getting sick from eating bad seafood, but CISAC senior research scholar Herb Lin told the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee that he hoped probabilistic risk analysis could help move the ball forward in the debate over encryption that’s pitted law enforcement and national security agencies against some of Silicon Valley’s most influential tech companies.
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Is Syria considering using chemical weapons? Experts suggest Iraq case could be a policy guide

News / June 29, 2015
As the risks escalate, the argument presented in Foreign Policy 18 months ago by Stanford scholars Scott Sagan and Ben Buch is particularly timely. In Our Red Lines and Theirs, Sagan, a professor of political science and Senior Fellow at FSI and at CISAC, and Buch, a PhD candidate in Political Science, laid out the reasons why Iraq did not resort to chemical attacks against US forces and used their findings to draw lessons that could be applied to the Syrian regime, another dictatorial regime armed with chemical weapons.
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Martha Crenshaw Is First Woman to Receive ISSS Distinguished Scholar Award

News / June 26, 2015
The International Studies Association is proud to announce that Martha Crenshaw, Senior Fellow at CISAC and FSI and Professor of Political Science (by courtesy) at Stanford University has been named the 2016 recipient of the International Security Studies Section (ISSS) Distinguished Scholar Award. She is the first woman to receive this award.
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Award-winning authors to discuss writing about war at Stanford Live event

News / June 26, 2015
Poet Natasha Trethewey and fiction writer Phil Klay will read selections from their works and join Stanford political scientist Scott Sagan in conversation on June 30 at Bing Concert Hall.
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CISAC Honors Alum Publishes Policy-Relevant Thesis Work on Zero-Days

News / June 22, 2015
A recent Lawfare blogpost by Mailyn Fidler (Class of 2014) featured research findings on zero-day vulnerabilities, the topic of both her CISAC honors thesis and a forthcoming law review paper. Fidler graduated from Stanford a year ago, having successfully completed the CISAC Honors Program in International Security Studies.
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CISAC Alum Vipin Narang returns to CISAC to discuss Strategies of Nuclear Proliferation

News / June 15, 2015
Before policymakers can combat proliferation of nuclear weapons they need to know how states choose to go about pursuing them, Vipin Narang told a Stanford audience at CISAC.
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Nuclear deal with Iran: Stanford scholars examine what’s at stake

News / June 10, 2015
Weeks away from a final international accord on Iran’s nuclear program, Stanford scholars are focusing on the technical, political and practical aspects of the pending deal intended to loosen sanctions while restricting Tehran’s ability to build a nuclear weapon.
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2016 Honors Students prepare for upcoming challenge

News / June 10, 2015
As the fifteenth class of CISAC Honors students prepares to receive their hard-earned honors conferrals, members of the sixteenth class are excited to embark on their honors journey.
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CISAC Celebrates Honors Students' Prize-Winning Research

News / June 4, 2015
As is the tradition, CISAC's Honors Program in International Studies recently awarded three prizes to some of its students. Taylor Grossman, Patrick Cirenza, and Teo Lamiot were awarded the Firestone Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Research, the William J. Perry Prize, and the John Holland Slusser World Peace Prize, respectively.
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US-Asia Security Initiative to address geopolitical challenges

News / June 1, 2015

Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC) is launching a U.S.-Asia Security Initiative spearheaded by a former top American diplomat to deepen dialogue on contemporary Asia-Pacific security issues and to further bridge American and Asian academics, government officials and industry leaders.

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Feinstein at Stanford: U.S. needs to track possible terrorists

News / May 29, 2015
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein says that the government's mass collection of communications data is misunderstood and that the data are used selectively and only for monitoring possible terrorist suspects.
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CISAC considers implications of bioengineered yeast and ongoing biotechnology revolution

News / May 27, 2015
Bioengineering researchers have recently constructed the final steps required to engineer yeast to manufacture opiates, including morphine and other medical drugs, from glucose, drawing significant interest, and concern, from the media and academics in the science and policy fields, including at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC).
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Crenshaw presents new book project on terrorism

News / May 26, 2015
What is it about terrorism that makes it so difficult to study and counteract through U.S. government policy? That’s the central question CISAC Senior Fellow Martha Crenshaw hopes to answer in an upcoming book she is co-authoring with Gary LaFree, Director of the National Center for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START).
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Feinstein at Stanford to discuss NSA, mass surveillance

News / May 26, 2015
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein will appear at Stanford on May 28 to discuss the impact of the National Security Agency's mass surveillance efforts on America's national security and individual liberty and privacy.
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29th anniversary of Chernobyl disaster marked by CISAC fellows’ work

News / May 11, 2015

It’s been 29 years since the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, but two nuclear security experts affiliated with the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) say there are still lessons to be learned from the worst nuclear accident of the 20th century.

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Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter unveils cyber strategy, calls for renewed partnership with Silicon Valley

News / April 23, 2015
Secretary of Defense Ashton B. Carter unveiled the Pentagon’s new cybersecurity strategy before a Stanford audience Thursday, saying the United States would defend the nation using cyber warfare and calling for a renewed partnership with Silicon Valley.
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Steven Chu: Climate change poses global security risks

News / April 16, 2015

 

A sustainable future is within reach, but it won’t prevent the world from experiencing the potentially catastrophic environmental and political consequences of climate change and environmental degradation, former Secretary of Energy Steven Chu told a Stanford audience.

Chu, who shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics and served as the energy secretary under President Barack Obama from 2009 to 2013, held a seminar at CISAC on Tuesday on climate change, sustainability and security.

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At Stanford, key diplomat describes changing face of NATO

Commentary / April 9, 2015

NATO is reassessing its fundamental relationship with Russia and focusing on new threats not imagined at its inception in the wake of World War II, a key U.S. diplomat told Stanford students and faculty.

Douglas Lute, America’s ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, said Washington and Moscow found a way to collaborate since the collapse of the Soviet Union. But that has changed under President Vladimir Putin, he said.

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Udall: Privacy is fundamental American right

News / April 3, 2015
Former U.S. Mark Udall addresses a "Security Conundrum" talk about NSA surveillance programs and warns they violate the fundamental right to privacy in America.
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FSI’s Hecker: Negotiators must convince Iran not to build nuclear bomb

News / April 3, 2015

Rigorous inspections, no cheating and continued talking can help generate a successful U.S.-Iranian nuclear deal, Stanford faculty experts say.

But the United States and the world community need to convince Iran it has more to lose than to gain from building a nuclear bomb, according to Siegfried Hecker, a research professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

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