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NATO’s 30th Member, At Last: Republic of North Macedonia

Blog / March 27, 2020

In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, good news often goes missing.  It’s worth highlighting that today, March 27, NATO has a new member, the Republic of North Macedonia.   Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg tweeted the news from NATO HQ in Brussels, and Skopje, the capital, was ecstatic: "The Republic of North Macedonia is officially the new, 30th NATO member," the government said in a statement. "We have fulfilled the dream of generations."

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When COVID-19 Delays a Nuclear Non-Proliferation Conference, Is There a Silver Lining?

Blog / March 26, 2020

Rose Gottemoeller is the Payne Distinguished Lecturer at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Center for Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, and was formerly the Deputy Secretary General of NATO

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Nuclear waste disposal: Why the case for deep boreholes is … full of holes

Commentary / March 26, 2020

In the budding days of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Trump idled his days away, launching random tweets about unrelated issues. One such issue was nuclear waste disposal: “Nevada, I hear you on Yucca Mountain…my Administration is committed to exploring innovative approaches – I’m confident we can get it done!”

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‘Just Say No’ Is Not a Strategy for Supply Chain Security

Commentary / March 25, 2020

On Feb. 12, White House National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien announced that the U.S. government has “evidence that Huawei has the capability secretly to access sensitive and personal information in systems it maintains and sells around the world.” This represents the latest attempt by the Trump administration to support an argument that allied governments—and the businesses they oversee—should purge certain telecommunications networks of Huawei equipment.

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Human Crap

Commentary / March 25, 2020

We are turning the world inside-out. Massive mining operations rip into rock, unearthing lithium, coltan and hundreds of other minerals to feed our gargantuan appetite for electronic stuff. Sand dredged from riverbeds and ocean floors becomes concrete; so far, there’s enough to cover the globe in a 2mm-thick shell. Oil sucked up from the seabed powers locomotion and manufacturing, and serves as the chemical base for our plasticised lives. We could easily wrap our concrete replica in plastic wrap.

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As US-Russian Arms Control Faces Expiration, Sides Face Tough Choices

Commentary / March 23, 2020

The Trump administration’s proposal for trilateral arms control negotiations appears to be gaining little traction in Moscow and Beijing, and the era of traditional nuclear arms control may be coming to an end just as new challenges emerge. This is not to say that arms control should be an end in it itself. It provides a tool that, along with the right combination of deterrence and defense forces and proper doctrine, can enhance U.S. and allied security and promote stability.

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Crimea:  Six Years after Illegal Annexation

Commentary / March 16, 2020

March 18 marks the sixth anniversary of Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea.  Attention now focuses on the Russian-Ukrainian conflict in Donbas, a conflict that has taken some 14,000 lives, but Moscow’s seizure of Crimea—the biggest land-grab in Europe since World War II—has arguably done as much or more damage to Europe’s post-Cold War security order.

 

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Zelensky’s Government Reshuffle in Ukraine Could Put Reforms at Risk

Commentary / March 13, 2020

In the most sweeping reshuffle of his government since he took office last May, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky fired his Cabinet and appointed a new prime minister earlier this month. The announcement comes at a tricky time, as the government is considering several reform measures that are seen as important to winning much-needed investor confidence.

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Is This the End of the Open Skies Treaty?

Commentary / March 7, 2020

Senior Trump administration officials reportedly will meet the week of March 9 to decide on withdrawing from the 1992 Open Skies Treaty. Doing so would constitute another mistake by an administration that increasingly seems set against arms control.

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What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

News / February 24, 2020
FSI Senior Fellows Karen Eggleston and David Relman joined host Michael McFaul on the World Class podcast to discuss all things COVID-19 — also known as the coronavirus.

What You Need To Know About the Coronavirus

News / February 24, 2020

The coronavirus — officially known as COVID-19 — has infected more than 75,000 people and killed more than 2,000 since it was first identified in Wuhan, China, in late December. Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) experts Karen Eggleston and David Relman joined host Michael McFaul on the World Class podcast to discuss what you should know about the virus, its impact on China and the world, and whether there is any truth to the rumors about its origins. 

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Ukraine: Six Years After the Maidan

Commentary / February 20, 2020

February 21 marks the sixth anniversary of the end of Ukraine’s Maidan Revolution. Three months of largely peaceful protests concluded in a spasm of deadly violence. President Victor Yanukovych fled Kyiv and later Ukraine, prompting the Rada (Ukraine’s parliament) to appoint acting leaders pending early elections. 

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Leaving Afghanistan: Pulling out without Pulling the Rug out

Commentary / February 19, 2020

The United States must at some point depart from Afghanistan and bring this costly “forever war” to a conclusion. With over 2,400 U.S. servicemembers killed, many more wounded, and nearly a trillion dollars spent to date, America’s leaders are under an obligation to design and execute a plan that stops a decades-long hemorrhaging of American blood and treasure.

 

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Senior Huawei Official Acknowledges Ability to Clandestinely Access Mobile Networks

Commentary / February 13, 2020

While everyone was distracted with Justice Department controversies and the New Hampshire primary, a senior Huawei official has conceded that the company can clandestinely access users’ mobile networks. 

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Ukraine may not yet escape US domestic politics

Commentary / February 12, 2020

Ukraine unhappily found itself at the center of the impeachment drama that played out in Washington last fall and during the first weeks of 2020. That threatened the resiliency of the U.S.-Ukraine relationship, a relationship that serves the interests of both countries.

With Donald Trump’s impeachment trial now in the past, Volodymyr Zelensky and Ukrainians undoubtedly hope that their country will no longer feature so prominently in U.S. domestic politics. That would be good, but it may not happen.

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China and East Asian Security Expert Oriana Skylar Mastro to Become FSI’s Newest Center Fellow

News / February 10, 2020
Mastro will be working primarily within the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), and in the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC).
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Iowa caucuses did one thing right: Require paper ballots

Commentary / February 4, 2020

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Don't Let New START Die

Commentary / February 3, 2020

The 2010 New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) expires in one year. Unfortunately, President Trump’s attitude seems to reflect disinterest, if not antipathy. Last April he asked for a proposal to involve Russia and China and cover all nuclear arms, but it has yet to emerge. Neither Moscow nor Beijing has shown any real interest in the concept.

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Pompeo visited Ukraine. Good. What next?

Commentary / February 3, 2020

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo spent January 31 in Kyiv underscoring American support for Ukraine, including in its struggle against Russian aggression. While Pompeo brought no major deliverables, just showing up proved enough for the Ukrainians.

The U.S. government should now follow up with steps to strengthen the U.S.-Ukraine relationship, which has been stressed by President Donald Trump’s bid to drag Ukraine’s leadership into U.S. politics.

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Russia Is Updating Its Nuclear Weapons: What Does That Mean for the Rest of Us?

Q&A / January 29, 2020

This article originally appeared on the website of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She is also the Payne Distinguished Lecturer at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

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Bipartisan US support for Ukraine at risk as Republicans echo Kremlin

Commentary / January 22, 2020

Speaking on Monday about Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, Ukraine’s foreign minister said “please don’t drag us into your [America’s] internal political processes.”  Unfortunately, Republicans appear intent on doing precisely that, as they repeat the false Russian claim that the Ukrainian government interfered in the 2016 US election.

Republicans see this as part of their effort to defend President Trump. In doing so, they put at risk America’s long-standing support for its Ukrainian partner.

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In the Wake of Soleimani’s Death, Experts Discuss What’s Next for Iran, the U.S., and the Middle East

News / January 16, 2020

Following the death of Qassem Soleimani, the commander of Iran’s Quds Force, five international affairs experts from the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) gathered to discuss Soleimani’s prominence in Iran, the potential consequences of Soleimani’s death on the surrounding Gulf states and U.S.-Iran relations, and the rising presence of Russia and China in the region.

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Why Invading Iran Would Be a Military Disaster

Commentary / January 12, 2020

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