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Journal Article

Thomas Hegghammer
American Political Science Review, 2013

This article studies variation in conflict theater choice by Western jihadists in an effort to understand their motivations. Some militants attack at home, whereas others join insurgencies abroad, but few scholars have asked why they make these different choices. Using open-source data, I estimate recruit supply for each theater, foreign fighter return rates, and returnee impact on domestic terrorist activity. The tentative data indicate that jihadists prefer foreign fighting, but a minority attacks at home after being radicalized, most often through foreign fighting or contact with a veteran.

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Journal Article

Timothy Junio
Journal of Strategic Studies, 2013

Many well-established explanations for war suggest that cyber weapons have a greater chance of being used offensively than other kinds of military technologies. This response article introduces a research agenda for the study of cyber war, and offers an example – principal-agent problems in cyber operations – to demonstrate how rigorous theoretical and empirical work may proceed.

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Journal Article

Daryl G. Press, Scott D. Sagan, Benjamin A. Valentino
American Political Science Review, 2013
How strong are normative prohibitions on state behavior? The authors examine this question by analyzing anti-nuclear norms, sometimes called the “nuclear taboo,” using an original survey experiment to evaluate American attitudes regarding nuclear use. The authors find that the public has only a weak aversion to using nuclear weapons and that this aversion has few characteristics of an “unthinkable” behavior or taboo. Instead, public attitudes about whether to use nuclear weapons are driven largely by consequentialist considerations of military utility. Americans’ willingness to use nuclear weapons increases dramatically when nuclear weapons provide advantages over conventional weapons in destroying critical targets. Americans who oppose the use of nuclear weapons seem to do so primarily for fear of setting a negative precedent that could lead to the use of nuclear weapons by other states against the United States or its allies in the future.
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Journal Article

Karl Eikenberry, Karl Eikenberry
The Journal of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, 2013

This article draws from the annual lecture in ‘U.S. Security in the 21st Century Series,’ sponsored by the National Committee on American Foreign Policy; it was delivered by the author on September 27, 2012, in New York City.  It explores the U.S.

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Journal Article

Thomas Fingar, Fan Jishe
The Washington Quarterly, 2013

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