All CISAC News News October 31, 2022

Scott D. Sagan Awarded the Thérèse Delpech Memorial Award

The Thérèse Delpech Memorial Award from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is presented to an individual who has rendered exceptional service to the nongovernmental nuclear policy community.
Man with glasses and gray hair

On Friday October 28, Professor Scott Sagan, co-director of Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) was awarded Thérèse Delpech Memorial Award from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace at their International Nuclear Policy Conference.

This award is presented to an individual who has rendered exceptional service to the nongovernmental nuclear policy community. While exceptional service includes major intellectual contributions to critical debates, it also encompasses the time-consuming and often unrecognized work needed to sustain and strengthen the nuclear security community: mentoring young women and men; constructively critiquing the work of others; creating fora for discussion; building networks; and enhancing diversity, equity, and inclusion. Such activities benefit the nuclear security community as a whole in its efforts to reduce nuclear dangers. Importantly, the award is also intended to recognize individuals who, through friendship, collegiality, and respect, help mold a collection of individual researchers into a community worthy of the name. 

In short, the award recognizes exceptional creativity, integrity, humanity, and amity—four qualities embodied by Thérèse Delpech, a long-time strategic adviser to the French Atomic Energy Commission, an author, and a distinguished public intellectual. 

Previous winners of the award are William Potter (2021), Harald Müller (2019), Catherine McArdle Kelleher (2017), Michael Krepon (2015), and Ambassador Linton F. Brooks (2013). 

The award was presented by Dr. Vipin Narang, the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space Policy. Dr Narang is a Stanford alumnus and a former Stanton Foundation nuclear security junior faculty fellow at CISAC. 

In a complex, changing, and increasingly contested world, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace generates strategic ideas and independent analysis, supports diplomacy, and trains the next generation of international scholar-practitioners to help countries and institutions take on the most difficult global problems and safeguard peace.