CISAC Fellowship Program

CISAC offers a rich variety of fellowships for scholars who want to spend an academic year researching an international security issue.

CISAC Fellowships

CISAC fellows (predoctoral, postdoctoral, and junior faculty) may focus on a variety of security topics, including: nuclear weapons policy and nonproliferation; nuclear energy; digital security (cyber, artificial intelligence and autonomous systems); biosecurity and global health; insurgency, terrorism and civil conflict; national security strategies; and global governance.

We welcome other research proposals, and we will consider applicants from the U.S. and abroad. CISAC welcomes applications from women, minorities, and without regard to citizenship. Applicants will be considered for all fellowships for which they are deemed eligible.

CISAC is grateful for fellowship funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Stanton Foundation, and Carnegie Corporation of New York, as well as many individual donors.

 


Fellowship Opportunities by Research Area

 

Cybersecurity and International Security Fellowship

CISAC Cyber Policy Fellows may focus on any aspect of cybersecurity with an important connection to public policy, including (but not limited to) international security and international relations, critical infrastructure protection, privacy and civil liberties, and the future of the Internet.  Applicants may also find interesting research topics at http://cisac.fsi.stanford.edu/content/evolving-research-agenda-cyber-pol..., and they should feel free to argue for researching some aspect at the nexus of cybersecurity and public policy that is not described therein.  All else being equal, preference will be afforded to those interested in an ongoing research project, which at this time include projects on the use of offensive cyber capabilities as instruments of national policy and a Track II dialog on cybersecurity as it relates to China and the United States.

 

Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) Policy Fellowship

The inaugural HAI-CISAC Fellows will pursue research on policy issues related to Stanford University’s Human-Centered AI Institute's (HAI) mission of guiding the development of artificial intelligence to ensure that it benefits humanity, as well as contribute to Center for International Security and Cooperation’s work on digital security writ large. Research focus areas may include, among others, regulatory and governance frameworks, policy prescriptions for addressing societal impacts of AI, or national or international security implications of AI. Fellows will be an integral part of the larger fellowship program at CISAC. This program provides faculty mentorship and requires fellows’ participation in the CISAC Fellows’ Policy Workshop, a biweekly meeting that takes place throughout the academic year and is designed to help fellows bridge the gap between academia and the policy community. All HAI-CISAC fellows are expected to participate in HAI and CISAC research seminars and produce policy-relevant work, which could include media appearances, published articles, or briefings to or workshops for government or international organization officials, ideally in collaboration with researchers from other disciplines. Fellows with backgrounds in the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, history, and law are encouraged to apply. Both pre- and post-doctoral fellowships are available, but all candidates are expected to be in their final year or have recently completed a terminal degree in their discipline.

 

Natural Sciences or Engineering International Security Fellowship 

Fellows with backgrounds in the natural sciences and in engineering may use their technical expertise from the public and private sectors, the national laboratories, and the military to: pursue research projects on the intersection of hard science, policymaking, and international security; and to hone their science communication skills.

 

Nuclear Security Fellowship

The MacArthur Foundation Nuclear Security Fellowships are intended to promote training and policy-relevant scholarship in three interrelated areas: nuclear weapons policy in a changing global context; nuclear terrorism and transnational flows of materials and knowledge; and nuclear energy and nonproliferation challenges. The Stanton Nuclear Security Fellowship are designed to aid in the development of the next generation of thought leaders in nuclear security by supporting research that will advance policy-relevant understanding of nuclear-related issues. They offer engineers, scientists, and social scientists the opportunity to focus on issues related to nuclear security. Alongside their scholarly work, fellows are expected to produce directly policy-relevant work, such as a media appearance, a published article on a reputable website, or a written briefing for a government or international organization.

 

Social Sciences or Humanities International Security Fellowship

CISAC fellows (predoctoral, postdoctoral, junior faculty, and professional) may focus on a variety of security topics, including: nuclear weapons policy and nonproliferation; nuclear energy; cybersecurity, cyberwarfare, and the future of the Internet; biosecurity and global health; implications of geostrategic shifts; insurgency, terrorism, and homeland security; war and civil conflict; consolidating peace after conflict; as well as global governance, migration, and transnational flows, from norms to criminal trafficking.

 

Stanford Internet Observatory Research Fellowship

The inaugural Internet Observatory Fellows will pursue research on policy and technical issues related to Stanford’s research into the misuse of new technologies to cause harm to individuals and societies. Research focus areas may include studying current geopolitical events driven by information operations against elections, researching the use of communication platforms to cause harm to at-risk groups, designing strategies to mitigate the harm of new technologies, and developing regulatory and governance frameworks for tech companies and governments. Fellows will be an integral part of the larger fellowship program at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) at Stanford University. This program provides faculty mentorship and requires fellows’ participation in the CISAC Fellows’ Policy Workshop, a biweekly meeting that takes place throughout the academic year and is designed to help fellows bridge the gap between academia and the policy community. All SIO fellows are expected to participate in CISAC research seminars and produce policy-relevant work, which could include media appearances, published articles, or briefings to or workshops for government or international organization officials, ideally in collaboration with researchers from other disciplines. Fellows with backgrounds in the natural sciences, engineering, data science, social sciences, history, and law are encouraged to apply. All fellows are expected to be in the final stages of or have recently completed a terminal degree in their discipline, ideally a Ph.D.

 


Learn more about the CISAC Fellowship Program

Apply for a CISAC Fellowship

Questions? Contact us at CISACfellowship@stanford.edu.