Security

Security

FSI scholars produce research aimed at creating a safer world and examing the consequences of security policies on institutions and society. They look at longstanding issues including nuclear nonproliferation and the conflicts between countries like North and South Korea. But their research also examines new and emerging areas that transcend traditional borders – the drug war in Mexico and expanding terrorism networks. FSI researchers look at the changing methods of warfare with a focus on biosecurity and nuclear risk. They tackle cybersecurity with an eye toward privacy concerns and explore the implications of new actors like hackers.

Along with the changing face of conflict, terrorism and crime, FSI researchers study food security. They tackle the global problems of hunger, poverty and environmental degradation by generating knowledge and policy-relevant solutions. 

Recent News

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Fear about China’s new space weapon echoes older worries about war from space

October 2021

China flight-tested a new breed of space weapon when it launched a massive “Long March” rocket tipped with a nuclear-capable, hypersonic glider. But history tells us why the test isn’t a cause for...

Go Bold or Go Home: The Nuclear Posture Review Must Give Biden Real Options

October 2021

The NPR must position President Biden to right-size America's nuclear forces and pursue arms control negotiations.

The North Korean Nuclear Question Revisited: Facts, Myths and Uncertainties

September 2021

Facts are difficult to come by, myths are deeply ingrained, and uncertainties lurk everywhere — that, in short, is the nature of North Korea’s nuclear program.

Strengthen U.S. Security Through Nuclear Arms Reductions

September 2021

Biden has an opportunity to bolster deterrence, reduce proliferation risks, and lower the risk of nuclear war.

Australia will get nuclear-powered submarines. Some see a proliferation threat.

September 2021

The new AUKUS security partnership led to an immediate diplomatic fallout between France and the United States. But beyond the concerns about NATO and the Western alliance, or questions about great-...

How Stanford Scholars Are Teaching the Next Generation About 9/11

September 2021

On the 20th anniversary of 9/11, four Stanford scholars and leading experts in national security, terrorism and contemporary conflict – Condoleezza Rice, Amy Zegart, Martha Crenshaw and Lisa Blaydes...

Putting Emotion Back Into 9/11

August 2021

For coming generations of students, September 11 is history rather than memory. How does that affect how they learn about it?

The U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan and the Fall of Kabul: A Q&A with Allen Weiner

August 2021

National security law expert Allen Weiner, a research affiliate at CDDRL and CISAC, discusses the U.S. mission to Afghanistan, its withdrawal and consequences moving forward.

Can Biden Do Anything to Stop Ransomware Attacks?

July 2021

Christopher Painter explains why the emerging pattern of ransomware attacks needs to be addressed at a political level – both domestically and internationally – and not be treated solely as a...

How the Kremlin Uses Agenda Setting to Paint Democracy in Panic

February 2021

Since November 2020, the world has watched the presidential transition in the United States with unease. After a violent mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in an effort to...

The Soft War That America Is Losing

January 2021

The US depends far more on its soft power than authoritarian China does. Once it is lost, it is hard to get back.

China’s South China Sea Strategy Prioritizes Deterrence Against the US, Says Stanford Expert

December 2020

Analysis by FSI Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro reveals that the Chinese military has taken a more active role in China’s South China Sea strategy, but not necessarily a more aggressive one.

A Nuclear Strike Should Require More than One Person’s Order

November 2020

Donald Trump has proven to be volatile, erratic, vengeful and prone to angry outbursts. Last week, as the vote count pushed his reelection bid out of sight, he reportedly fell into a dark mood.

Reflections of a Scientist Laboring in the Nuclear Waste Field

November 2020

The U.S. nuclear waste and disposal system is a failure--even though it has been active for more than 50 years at a cost of tens of billions of dollars. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 was born...

Update on Taiwan and China's Troubled Relationship: Oriana Skylar Mastro on NPR

October 2020

"The current threat is that the CCP is running out of patience, and their military is becoming more and more capable. So for the first time in its history, there's the option of taking...

The United States Must Avoid a Nuclear Arms Race with China

September 2020

Oriana Skylar Mastro explains why U.S. nuclear policy needs to minimize the role of nuclear weapons in the U.S.-China great power competition and pave the way for arms control.

Understanding China's Social Credit System

August 2020

Does a tracking system making laws more enforceable actually improve society?

Oriana Skylar Mastro Awarded America in the World Consortium Prize for Best Policy Article

July 2020

Mastro, who begins her role as FSI Center Fellow on August 1, has won the AWC Best Policy Article on U.S. Foreign Policy and Grand Strategy award for her insights on how China leverages ambiguity to...

The Geopolitical Ramifications of Starlink Internet Service?

June 2020

Starlink is a space-based internet service provider that seeks to provide high-speed (40 mbps upload, 100 mbps download ), near-global coverage of the populated world by 2021—bringing this service to...

What does COVID-19 mean for Ukraine’s frontlines?

June 2020

President Volodymyr Zelensky and his government in Ukraine face two fundamental challenges: ending the conflict with Russia and implementing domestic reform. Overcoming these challenges appeared hard...

Need To Know: Brett McGurk on America’s strategy to defeat ISIS

June 2020

US presidents tend to set maximalist objectives without necessarily providing the resourcing or laying the necessary diplomatic foundations to achieve such goals.

Going Nuclear on Climate Change?

May 2020

Three inter-related reasons why nuclear power cannot address our planetary crisis: time, money, and risk.

U.S.-Russian Nuclear Arms Control Negotiations—A Short History

May 2020

An accomplished negotiator puts nuclear arms control in perspective—what it has achieved, where it has failed and what it can do for our future security.

People

Jacquelyn Schneider Jacquelyn Schneider Hoover Fellow
Gabrielle Hecht Gabrielle Hecht Senior Fellow Professor, History
Herb Lin Herbert Lin Senior Research Scholar
U.S. soldier posing for picture Dean L. Winslow Senior Fellow, courtesy Professor, Medicine
bmkhigh Beatriz Magaloni Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
colin kahl Colin H. Kahl Senior Fellow Steven C. Házy Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
Jenny Martinez Headshot Jenny Martinez Senior Fellow, by courtesy Professor, Law
Rod Ewing Rodney C. Ewing Senior Fellow Professor of Geological Sciences
Fearon James James D. Fearon Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Andrew Grotto Andrew Grotto Director, Program on Geopolitics, Technology, and Governance
Sagan, Scott 2012 photo Scott D. Sagan Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
weinstein Jeremy M. Weinstein Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science