Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. 

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. 

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Recent Old News

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Opinion: The Coronavirus Crisis Presents An Opportunity To End War In Ukraine

April 2020

In the midst of the damage to public health and the global economy, the COVID-19 crisis could present an unexpected opportunity both to resolve the only hot war in Europe and to address Russian...

March: A Roller Coaster Month for Ukraine

April 2020

Ukrainians rode a wild roller coaster in March.  President Volodymyr Zelensky began the month by firing the prime minister and reshuffling the cabinet, prompting concern that oligarchs were...

‘Just Say No’ Is Not a Strategy for Supply Chain Security

March 2020

On Feb. 12, White House National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien announced that the U.S.

Crimea:  Six Years after Illegal Annexation

March 2020

March 18 marks the sixth anniversary of Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea.  Attention now focuses on the Russian-Ukrainian conflict in Donbas, a conflict that has taken some 14,000 lives, but...

Zelensky’s Government Reshuffle in Ukraine Could Put Reforms at Risk

March 2020

In the most sweeping reshuffle of his government since he took office last May, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky fired his Cabinet and appointed a new prime minister earlier this month.

U.S.-Russia Young Professionals Nuclear Forum Participants Receive Rieser Award Honorable Mention

January 2020

For the first time in the history of the Leonard M. Rieser Award, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists gave an honorable mention.

Sixth Young Professional Nuclear Forum Held in Moscow in November

January 2020

The sixth Young Professional Nuclear Forum (YPNF6), sponsored by the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University and the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MEPhI...

Do Americans approve of Trump’s pardons for court-martialed military officers?

December 2019

/*-->*/ Americans show much less tolerance for war crimes than they did during the war in Vietnam. /*-->*/ Read the Rest at /*-->*/ Washington Post

Ratcheting up the Pressure: Assessing the Risks of Trump's Iran Policy

December 2019

/*-->*/ In May 2018, President Trump withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear deal, and re-imposed crippling economic sanctions against Tehran.

Life after Yucca Mountain: The time has come to reset US nuclear waste policy

December 2019

/*-->*/ After decades of inaction and stalemate, there are small but significant signs that the U.S.

Congress, Nord Stream II, and Ukraine

November 2019

Congress has long weighed sanctions as a tool to block the Nord Stream II gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea from Russia to Germany.

Order from Chaos: Five months into Ukrainian President Zelenskiy’s term, there are reasons for optimism and caution

November 2019

Editor's Note:  The observations in this article are based on the author’s conversations with Ukrainians, both inside and outside of government, and others in Kyiv during an October 31-November 2,...

Brett McGurk Recounts the Fight Against ISIS and Considers the Future Of Northern Syria

November 2019

Following the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and the decision by President Donald Trump to remove U.S.

Quid Pro Quos, Bureaucrats and Duty

October 2019

/*-->*/ For more than two weeks now, a stream of current and former U.S. officials, this week including Amb.

The Whistle-Blower Really Knows How to Write

October 2019

/*-->*/ Smoking guns are the stuff of spy movies. In real-life intelligence-gathering, they are exceptionally rare.

President Trump, Quid Pro Quos and U.S.-Ukraine Relations: Five Observations

October 2019

/*-->*/ Over the past two weeks, a CIA whistleblower’s complaint, a White House record of a July 25 telephone conversation between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky,...

Dueling U.S. Approaches to Ukraine Pose Risk

October 2019

/*-->*/ CISAC’s Steven Pifer, former U.S. Ambassador to the Ukraine, looks at the dueling US foreign policies toward Ukraine – one aimed at U.S.

Advice for President Zelenskyy as he Prepares to Meet President Trump

August 2019

President Volodymyr Zelenskyy may meet President Donald Trump this weekend in Warsaw and is expected to travel to the United States later in the fall.  This gives Mr.

What it Takes for U.S. Foreign Policy to Succeed in the Middle East

July 2019

Brett McGurk, the former Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL, has had a busy summer.

Debate Moderators Don’t Know Much About National Security

July 2019

Viewers of the Democratic presidential debates learned quite a bit this week—from Joe Biden’s views of school busing to Marianne Williamson’s plan to defeat President Donald Trump with love.

Decades of Being Wrong About China Should Teach Us Something

June 2019

Thirty years ago this week, I watched the news from Beijing and started shredding my bedding.

The Crisis in Venezuela Continues, with Three Possibilities in Sight

June 2019

Venezuela is in the midst of an economic, social and political crisis, said Harold Trinkunas, the deputy director of FSI’s Center for International Security and Cooperation and an expert on Latin...

New report from Stanford scholars seeks to demystify the biosecurity landscape

December 2018

From genome editing to “hacking” the microbiome, advances in the life sciences and its associated technological revolution have already altered the biosecurity landscape, and will continue to do so...

Beijing Workshop Explores Options for Interventions in Civil Wars

November 2018

Shorenstein APARC’s U.S.-Asia Security Initiative (USASI), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), and the School for International Studies at Peking University recently co-hosted the...

People

Colin H. Kahl Senior Fellow Steven C. Házy Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
James D. Fearon Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Stephen Luby Senior Fellow
Amy Zegart Senior Fellow Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
Herb Lin Herbert Lin Senior Research Scholar
Dr. Thomas Fingar Thomas Fingar Lecturer at APARC
Joseph Felter Lecturer
Harold Trinkunas Deputy Director, Senior Research Scholar
Scott D. Sagan Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Jenny Martinez Senior Fellow, by courtesy Professor, Law
Brett McGurk Lecturer
Beatriz Magaloni Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science