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Michael M. May

May recognized for work on nuclear weapons and energy policy

News / April 8, 2014
CISAC's Michael May is awarded the Joseph A. Burton Forum Award by the American Physical Society for his lifetime of work educating the public about nuclear weapons and energy.
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Hiroshima Pledge: From Ground Zero to Global Zero

News / August 8, 2013
A survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, 68 years ago, recalls the horror of that day before a Stanford delegation led by Scott Sagan, who is helping the city reinvent itself as a beacon for Global Zero - the movement for a world without nuclear weapons.
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The real nuclear threat is to America's bases

Commentary / September 29, 2005
The six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear weapons raise public concerns about whether Pyongyang will indeed dismantle its nuclear weapons program or whether it will pursue long-range nuclear missiles that could destroy Seoul, Tokyo or an American city. Overlooked is the threat to U.S. military capabilities, write CISAC's Michael M. May and colleague Michael Nacht in this Financial Times op-ed.
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Dangerous doctrine: How new U.S. nuclear plans could backfire

News / February 18, 2005
A U.S. policy of preemption and a push for new nuclear weapon designs could be a recipe for disaster that makes proliferation more likely, not less, suggest CISAC researchers in the March/April Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists' cover story.
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The importance of teaching about nuclear weapons

Commentary / February 10, 2005
Addressing the moral and political problems posed by nuclear weapons issues, Michael M. May says "there is no moral or ethical solution or approach to these problems that is not based on an understanding of the details, both human and technical. Anything else, any a priori choice is at bottom fraudulent. That is the best argument for continuing to teach and learn about these matters." The former director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory shares his thoughts and advice on teaching students about the most destructive weapons yet created.
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So many deaths -- for nothing

Commentary / May 13, 2004
Michael May: Regardless of the evidence, regardless of the costs, the United States was going to war in Iraq.
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