Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine

FSI’s researchers assess health and medicine through the lenses of economics, nutrition and politics. They’re studying and influencing public health policies of local and national governments and the roles that corporations and nongovernmental organizations play in providing health care around the world. Scholars look at how governance affects citizens’ health, how children’s health care access affects the aging process and how to improve children’s health in Guatemala and rural China. They want to know what it will take for people to cook more safely and breathe more easily in developing countries.

FSI professors investigate how lifestyles affect health. What good does gardening do for older Americans? What are the benefits of eating organic food or growing genetically modified rice in China? They study cost-effectiveness by examining programs like those aimed at preventing the spread of tuberculosis in Russian prisons. Policies that impact obesity and undernutrition are examined; as are the public health implications of limiting salt in processed foods and the role of smoking among men who work in Chinese factories. FSI health research looks at sweeping domestic policies like the Affordable Care Act and the role of foreign aid in affecting the price of HIV drugs in Africa.

Recent Scholarly Publications

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"I am a Radioactive Mutant": Emergent Biological Subjectivities at Kazakhstan's Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

February 2016

The Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan was conceived as an experimental landscape where science, technology, Soviet Cold War militarism, and human biology intersected.

Gain-of-function experiments: time for a real debate

December 2014

According to the WHO, dual use research of concern (DURC) is “life sciences research that is intended for benefit, but which might easily be misapplied to do harm”.

Analyzing Screening Policies for Childhood Obesity

April 2013

Abstract: Because of the health and economic costs of childhood obesity, coupled with studies suggesting the benefits of comprehensive (dietary, physical activity, and behavioral counseling)...

Ready-to-use food-allocation policy to reduce the effects of childhood undernutrition in developing countries

March 2013

Abstract: Several aid groups have proposed strategies for allocating ready-touse (therapeutic and supplementary) foods to children in developing countries.

The Increasingly Compelling Moral Responsibilities of Life Scientists

March 2013

First paragraph of article:Many of my colleagues and fellow investigators in the life sciences were surprised in late 2011 to hear about the deliberate laboratory manipulation of highly pathogenic...

The Application of Ecological Theory Toward an Understanding of the Human Microbiome

June 2012

Abstract The human-microbial ecosystem plays a variety of important roles in human health and disease.

Sociotechnical Challenges of Developing an Interoperable Personal Health Record

October 2011

ObjectivesTo analyze sociotechnical issues involved in the process of developing an interoperable commercial Personal Health Record (PHR) in a hospital setting, and to create guidelines for future...

Rape Reporting During War: Why the Numbers Don't Mean What You Think They Do

August 2011

First page of the article: Reports of sexual violence during the ongoing unrest in Libya have captured headlines across the world.

Reducing Uncertainty: Intelligence Analysis and National Security

July 2011

Description from Stanford University Press: The US government spends billions of dollars every year to reduce uncertainty: to monitor and forecast everything from the weather to the spread of...

Modeling the Incubation Period of Inhalational Anthrax

July 2008

Ever since the pioneering work of Philip Sartwell, the incubation period distribution for infectious diseases is most often modeled using a lognormal distribution.

Fourth Dimension of Biomedicine, The

June 2007

The three dimensions of biomedicine that we are familiar with need no amplification: patient care, research and teaching will preoccupy all of our professional lives in one form or another.

Analyzing the Control of Mosquito-Borne Diseases by a Dominant Lethal Genetic System

May 2007

Motivated by the failure of current methods to control dengue fever, we formulate a mathematical model to assess the impact on the spread of a mosquito-borne viral disease of a strategy that...

Edge of Disaster, The: Rebuilding a Resilient Nation

February 2007

We have learned little from the cataclysms of September 11 and Hurricane Katrina. When it comes to catastrophe, America is living on borrowed time--and squandering it.

How Globalization Went Bad

January 2007

The article asserts that globalization has made the world a more dangerous and less orderly place.

Analyzing a Bioterror Attack on the Food Supply: The Case of Botulinum Toxin in Milk

July 2005

We developed a mathematical model of a cows-to-consumers supply chain associated with a single milk-processing facility that is the victim of a deliberate release of botulinum toxin.

Biotechnology and Bioterrorism: An Unprecedented World

December 2004

The web of measures that comprise the nuclear non-proliferation regime continues to hold at bay the "nuclear-armed crowd" that was part of President John F. Kennedy's alarming vision in 1963.

How it Feels to Get Old

July 2004

Some years ago, I spent a sabbatical year as a fellow at Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, doing research and finishing a book.

Mozambique: A Fading U.N. Success Story

January 2002

As Mozambique enters its tenth year of peace following a brutal and destructive civil war, the signs of continued democratic transformation and pro-market economic reform appear rosy, at least at...

Biological Terrorism and Public Health

April 2001

A biological terrorist attack probably would first be detected by doctors or other health-care workers.

Can the Twenty-fifth Amendment Deal with a Disabled President? Preventing Future White House Cover-ups

March 1999

The Twenty-fifth Amendment to the Constitution evolved as a response to the need to relieve a sick and disabled president fromthe responsibilities of office, in the best interests of both the sick...

Accidental Nuclear War: A Post-Cold War Assessment

December 1998

Background: In the 1980s, many medical organizations identified the prevention of nuclear war as one of the medical profession's most important goals.

China's Telecommunications: Present and Future

June 1997

By the end of 1995, China had built the world's ten largest telecommunications networks and the industry was growing at a faster rate than any other sector of the booming Chinese economy.

Can the Nation Afford a Senior Citizen As President? The Age Factor in the 1996 Election and Beyond

April 1997

Disabling illness has been widely observed among national leaders. This is hardly unexpected because many of them govern at an age when there is a high incidence of debilitating disease.

Deterrence and Defense: Opportunities for a Future European Defense Policy

March 1997

The renewed American debate over ballistic missile defenses (BMD) echoes loudly in NATO, in Europe, and in France.

People

Paul H. Wise Senior Fellow Professor, Pediatrics (CHP/PCOR)
David Relman Senior Fellow Professor, Medicine, Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
Paul Jackson Paul J. Jackson Affiliate