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Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine

FSI’s researchers assess health and medicine through the lenses of economics, nutrition and politics. They’re studying and influencing public health policies of local and national governments and the roles that corporations and nongovernmental organizations play in providing health care around the world. Scholars look at how governance affects citizens’ health, how children’s health care access affects the aging process and how to improve children’s health in Guatemala and rural China. They want to know what it will take for people to cook more safely and breathe more easily in developing countries.

FSI professors investigate how lifestyles affect health. What good does gardening do for older Americans? What are the benefits of eating organic food or growing genetically modified rice in China? They study cost-effectiveness by examining programs like those aimed at preventing the spread of tuberculosis in Russian prisons. Policies that impact obesity and undernutrition are examined; as are the public health implications of limiting salt in processed foods and the role of smoking among men who work in Chinese factories. FSI health research looks at sweeping domestic policies like the Affordable Care Act and the role of foreign aid in affecting the price of HIV drugs in Africa.

Recent Events

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Hidden Risks: global supply chains, public health and global governance

February 24, 2017

About the Event: Despite much current talk about “America First,” the United States has a vital interest in global health that is rooted in both practical necessity and humanitarian traditions. ...

Vector-borne disease in a changing world: Insights from ecology across scales

January 5, 2017

Abstract: Globally, infectious diseases are emerging at an increasing rate. Vector-borne diseases in particular present one of the biggest threats to public health globally.

Metrology is a Common Good: The Foundations of Sharing, Trusting, and Dividing

November 18, 2016

Abstract: Trustworthy measurement results are basic to human interaction.

The Global Infectious Disease Threat and Dual use Pathogens

October 27, 2016

Abstract: The Federal response to dual use pathogens is being actively debated. We are at a critical juncture between free science exploration and government policy. Should science be regulated?

Challenges for privacy and re-identification with medical and genomic data

September 22, 2016

Abstract: Current technologies and practices have created large stores of medical data, including electronic medical records, genomic data, and mobile-health measurements.

Health and human movement: global challenges, local solutions

February 22, 2016

Abstract: The interactions between biological and cultural processes are critical determinants of human health.

Technology Impact on Biosecurity Policy and Practice

October 26, 2015

Abstract: The threat of biological attack on the people of the United States and the world, whether intentional, natural or accidental, is of growing concern, both in spite of and because of...

New bio-based supply chains for drugs

May 11, 2015

Abstract: Recent advances in synthetic biology are transforming our capacities to make things with biology.

New Tools for Genome Editing and the Future of the Earth

April 13, 2015

Abstract: CRISPR-Cas9 and other new tools are making genome editing faster, cheaper, and more accurate.

Interschool Honors Program in International Security Studies Information Session

January 20, 2015

CISAC Interschool Honors Program in International Security StudiesINFORMATION SESSION for Stanford undergraduates interested in applying for the 2015-2016 academic year   Meet program faculty,...

Is Nipah virus a threat to global security?

April 14, 2014

Abstract: Nipah virus lives in large fruit bats in South and Southeast Asia. When people become infected with Nipah virus over half of them die.

Bringing to Light Hidden Incentives and Disincentives in Global Health

April 7, 2014

About the talk: This presentation will discuss the centrality and challenges of health-specific technological progress in global health improvement.

Two technical projects in international humanitarian innovation: Africa and India

February 10, 2014

Africa (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2013): USAID and the UN's World Food Program have proposed strategies for allocating ready-to-use (therapeutic and supplementary) foods to...

What's out there? Microbial diversity, security, and the public health

October 14, 2013

More information TBA.    Speaker bio: David A. Relman, M.D., is the Thomas C. and Joan M.

A New Paradigm for Engaging the War on Infectious Diseases

April 29, 2013

From the 1950s through the 1970s, the success of antibiotics and vaccines in controlling or eradicating infectious diseases (ID) worldwide resulted in decreased emphasis on development of ID...

Some Future Directions in System and Network Trustworthiness

March 19, 2013

Peter will discuss work at SRI and the University of Cambridge under two projects currently funded by DARPA, relating to clean-slate architectures for hardware, software, networking, and clouds,...

The Hazards of Low Level Ionizing Radiation: Controversy and Evidence

March 12, 2013

Symposium description: A unique, two-day symposium at which an international panel of leading medical and biological scientists, nuclear engineers, and policy experts will make presentations on and...

Mobilizing Public Law: The Lost Wartime Origins of American Administrative Law

November 29, 2012

Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar is a professor and Deane F.

Global Health Diplomacy in North Korea: the Stanford Tuberculosis Project in the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea

November 26, 2012

About the topic: Stanford University, in collaboration with humanitarian NGOs, WHO, the Global Fund and the North Korean Ministry of Public Health have undertaken to develop that country's first...

Global Health Impacts of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident

October 1, 2012

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011.

Public Goods Provision and the Efficacy of Governance

May 18, 2012

On May 18-19, the Program on Poverty and Governance and the Center for Latin American Studies will host a two-day conference on the provision of public goods and good governance throughout the...

The Uses and Limitations of Forensic DNA Typing

May 17, 2012

The tools of molecular biology have augmented forensic biological analyses and contributed to solving crimes, developing investigative leads, and exonerating the innocent.

Terror Queues and the Duration of Terror Plots

April 10, 2012

About the topic: What could queueing theory, the science of customer flows and delays in service systems, possibly offer towards understanding and countering terrorism?

People

Paul H. Wise Senior Fellow Professor, Pediatrics (CHP/PCOR)
David Relman Senior Fellow Professor, Medicine, Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
Paul Jackson Paul J. Jackson Affiliate